ČEPLOVÁ, Natálie, Zdeňka LOSOSOVÁ, Milan CHYTRÝ, Jiří DANIHELKA, Karel FAJMON, Deana LÁNÍKOVÁ, Zdenka PREISLEROVÁ, Vladimír ŘEHOŘEK, Lubomír TICHÝ and David ZELENÝ. Phylogenetic diversity of urban habitats with different levels of disturbance. In 56th International Symposium of IAVS, Tartu, Estonia. 2013. ISBN 978-9985-4-0754-7.
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Basic information
Original name Phylogenetic diversity of urban habitats with different levels of disturbance
Name in Czech Fylogenetická diverzita městské vegetace s různou mírou narušení
Authors ČEPLOVÁ, Natálie, Zdeňka LOSOSOVÁ, Milan CHYTRÝ, Jiří DANIHELKA, Karel FAJMON, Deana LÁNÍKOVÁ, Zdenka PREISLEROVÁ, Vladimír ŘEHOŘEK, Lubomír TICHÝ and David ZELENÝ.
Edition 56th International Symposium of IAVS, Tartu, Estonia, 2013.
Other information
Type of outcome Presentations at conferences
Confidentiality degree is not subject to a state or trade secret
ISBN 978-9985-4-0754-7
Keywords (in Czech) avpd, fylogenetická diverzita, městská vegetace
Keywords in English avpd, phylogenetic diversity, urban vegetation
Tags International impact
Changed by Changed by: Mgr. Natálie Čeplová, Ph.D., učo 13913. Changed: 7/10/2013 10:58.
Abstract
Communities of different urban habitats cover a broad range of different disturbance intensities and thus they provide a suitable model gradient, however, their phylogenetic alpha diversity has been hardly ever studied. We hypothesize that (1) the level of disturbances affects phylogenetic alpha diversity of urban plant communities; (2) phylogenetic structure of species groups with different residence time responds differently to disturbances; (3) introduction of alien species changes phylogenetic structure of urban plant communities. Data sampling was carried in 2007–2009 in 32 European cities. In each city seven habitats were chosen: central square, boulevard, residential area, housing estate, park, strongly disturbed area with scarce vegetation cover and abandoned area with perennial grassland and shrubs. Plots of 1-ha size were sampled in each habitat type by recording all spontaneously occurring taxa of vascular plants. The phylogenetic tree was constructed for all recorded taxa. Subsequently, for each plot phylogenetic diversity based on phylogenetic distances (avpd, average phylogenetic distinctiveness) was calculated. Phylogenetic alpha diversity (avpd) can be clustered (i.e. significantly lower than random), random or overdispersed (i.e. significantly higher than random). Using a null model which corresponds to random distribution of species, we tested whether avpd value is non-random. We found that phylogenetic structure of urban plant communities tends to be clustered in all the studied urban habitats. The reason is probably strong environmental filtering. The clustering is strongest in heavily disturbed habitats, which is consistent with our first hypothesis. We also confirmed the second hypothesis that groups of species with different residence time differ in their phylogenetic structure. Phylogenetic alpha diversity of native species tends to be random, whereas diversity of alien species is often clustered in the studied habitats. We assume that the occurrence of alien species is often limited to specific habitats that select phylogenetically related species with similar traits. Phylogenetic alpha diversity increases with the proportion of native species in the habitat. In contrast, archaeophytes reduce phylogenetic alpha diversity of the community. The proportion of neophytes has no significant effect on community phylogenetic alpha diversity, obviously because neophytes include taxa with various degree of relatedness.
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