KŘÍŽ, Zdeněk, Jan POLIŠENSKÝ and Martin KULA. Ideological Sources of China’s International Behaviour. In Marian Majer, Róbert Ondrejcsák. Panorama of global security environment 2013. 1st ed. Bratislava: CENAA, 2013. p. 483-494. Panorama. ISBN 978-80-971124-5-5.
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Basic information
Original name Ideological Sources of China’s International Behaviour
Name in Czech Ideologické zdroje čínského chování v mezinárodních vztazích
Authors KŘÍŽ, Zdeněk (203 Czech Republic, guarantor, belonging to the institution), Jan POLIŠENSKÝ (203 Czech Republic, belonging to the institution) and Martin KULA (703 Slovakia).
Edition 1. vyd. Bratislava, Panorama of global security environment 2013, p. 483-494, 12 pp. Panorama, 2013.
Publisher CENAA
Other information
Original language English
Type of outcome Chapter(s) of a specialized book
Field of Study 50601 Political science
Country of publisher Slovakia
Confidentiality degree is not subject to a state or trade secret
Publication form printed version "print"
RIV identification code RIV/00216224:14230/13:00072844
Organization unit Faculty of Social Studies
ISBN 978-80-971124-5-5
Keywords (in Czech) Čína; ideologie; chování; mezinárodní vztahy
Keywords in English China; ideology; behaviour; IR
Tags International impact, Reviewed
Changed by Changed by: prof. PhDr. Zdeněk Kříž, Ph.D., učo 37415. Changed: 28. 4. 2014 21:20.
Abstract
If we were to characterize these current times in terms of international relations, the Rise of Asia comes readily to mind. The global power shift is already creating its own references, such as “The Asian Century” or “The Post-American World.” Most of the attention is presently focused on China and therefore it is important to analyse the ideological sources of China’s international behaviour. How will the world’s second largest economy wielding an arsenal of nuclear weapons behave in an international system it joined in the 1970s remains a crucial issue not only for its neighbours but the entire world. The authors assume that in the foreseeable future, China’s behaviour in international relations will be primarily influenced by growing nationalism mixed with Confucianism and secondarily by communist ideology. The power of communist ideology is being eroded by the reality of everyday life in China. Chinese political elites will therefore increasingly utilize nationalism and Confucianism as instruments of mass mobilization, as well as a mechanism legitimizing their position in the power pyramid. To stay on the saddled tiger, they will be forced to limit openness for the sake of formulation of a more radical nationalist alternative. This path might increase the risks of conflict escalation with neighbouring states.
Abstract (in Czech)
If we were to characterize these current times in terms of international relations, the Rise of Asia comes readily to mind. The global power shift is already creating its own references, such as “The Asian Century” or “The Post-American World.” Most of the attention is presently focused on China and therefore it is important to analyse the ideological sources of China’s international behaviour. How will the world’s second largest economy wielding an arsenal of nuclear weapons behave in an international system it joined in the 1970s remains a crucial issue not only for its neighbours but the entire world. The authors assume that in the foreseeable future, China’s behaviour in international relations will be primarily influenced by growing nationalism mixed with Confucianism and secondarily by communist ideology. The power of communist ideology is being eroded by the reality of everyday life in China. Chinese political elites will therefore increasingly utilize nationalism and Confucianism as instruments of mass mobilization, as well as a mechanism legitimizing their position in the power pyramid. To stay on the saddled tiger, they will be forced to limit openness for the sake of formulation of a more radical nationalist alternative. This path might increase the risks of conflict escalation with neighbouring states.
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