KŘÍŽ, Zdeněk. NATO Enlargement: Disaster or Success? Evaluation of Worst Case Scenarios. In Robert Czulda, Marek Madej. NEWCOMERS NO MORE? Contemporary NATO and the Future of the Enlargement from the Perspective of “Post-Cold War” Members. 1st ed. Warsaw - Prague - Brussels: International Relations Research Institute in Warsaw, 2015. p. 117-130. NATO PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION. ISBN 978-83-62784-04-2.
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Basic information
Original name NATO Enlargement: Disaster or Success? Evaluation of Worst Case Scenarios
Name in Czech NATO Enlargement: Disaster or Success? Evaluation of Worst Case Scenarios
Authors KŘÍŽ, Zdeněk (203 Czech Republic, guarantor, belonging to the institution).
Edition 1. vyd. Warsaw - Prague - Brussels, NEWCOMERS NO MORE? Contemporary NATO and the Future of the Enlargement from the Perspective of “Post-Cold War” Members, p. 117-130, 14 pp. NATO PUBLIC DIPLOMACY DIVISION, 2015.
Publisher International Relations Research Institute in Warsaw
Other information
Original language English
Type of outcome Chapter(s) of a specialized book
Field of Study 50601 Political science
Country of publisher Belgium
Confidentiality degree is not subject to a state or trade secret
Publication form electronic version available online
WWW URL
RIV identification code RIV/00216224:14230/15:00084149
Organization unit Faculty of Social Studies
ISBN 978-83-62784-04-2
Keywords (in Czech) NATO; rozšiřování; obavy; realita
Keywords in English NATO; enlargement; fears; reality
Tags International impact, Reviewed
Changed by Changed by: Ing. Alena Raisová, učo 36962. Changed: 2/5/2016 16:23.
Abstract
Despite the strong criticism against the NATO enlargement policy, we can conclude that the enlargement has not caused any significant damage to the Alliance. NATO’s internal cohesion did not suffer a great loss, as seeking a consensus between members is just as difficult as it was in the Cold War period. The dividing lines between members on controversial issues are not drawn on the grounds of the length of membership. Moreover, no new iron curtains have been dropped, as the “new” member states further support the NATO “open door” policy. Last but not least, almost all NATO members, not only “the newcomers”, should increase their military expenditures. The only exception is an obvious deterioration of relations with Russia, which occurred after Russia had launched the war with Georgia in 2008, and especially when it annexed Crimea and started a “hybrid war” against Ukraine in 2014.
Abstract (in Czech)
Despite the strong criticism against the NATO enlargement policy, we can conclude that the enlargement has not caused any significant damage to the Alliance. NATO’s internal cohesion did not suffer a great loss, as seeking a consensus between members is just as difficult as it was in the Cold War period. The dividing lines between members on controversial issues are not drawn on the grounds of the length of membership. Moreover, no new iron curtains have been dropped, as the “new” member states further support the NATO “open door” policy. Last but not least, almost all NATO members, not only “the newcomers”, should increase their military expenditures. The only exception is an obvious deterioration of relations with Russia, which occurred after Russia had launched the war with Georgia in 2008, and especially when it annexed Crimea and started a “hybrid war” against Ukraine in 2014.
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