KYPR, Jaroslav, Iva KEJNOVSKÁ, Klára BEDNÁŘOVÁ and Michaela VORLÍČKOVÁ. CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY OF NUCLEIC ACIDS. In Berova, N., Polavarapu, L. P., Nakanishi, K., Woody, R.W. Comprehensive Chiroptical Spectroscopy : Applications in Stereochemical Analysis of Synthetic Compounds, Natural Products, and Biomolecules. Hoboken (NJ, USA): John Wiley & Sons, 2012. p. 575-586. Volume 2. ISBN 978-1-118-01292-5. doi:10.1002/9781118120392.ch17.
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Basic information
Original name CIRCULAR DICHROISM SPECTROSCOPY OF NUCLEIC ACIDS
Authors KYPR, Jaroslav, Iva KEJNOVSKÁ, Klára BEDNÁŘOVÁ and Michaela VORLÍČKOVÁ.
Edition Hoboken (NJ, USA), Comprehensive Chiroptical Spectroscopy : Applications in Stereochemical Analysis of Synthetic Compounds, Natural Products, and Biomolecules, p. 575-586, 12 pp. Volume 2, 2012.
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Other information
Original language English
Type of outcome Chapter(s) of a specialized book
Field of Study 10610 Biophysics
Country of publisher United States of America
Confidentiality degree is not subject to a state or trade secret
Publication form printed version "print"
WWW URL
Organization unit Central European Institute of Technology
ISBN 978-1-118-01292-5
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/9781118120392.ch17
Keywords in English nucleic acid CD spectroscopy; guanine quadruplexes; CD spectra; whole spectrum; CD; interpretation
Tags ne MU, rivok
Tags International impact, Reviewed
Changed by Changed by: Olga Křížová, učo 56639. Changed: 11. 4. 2013 10:58.
Abstract
Circular dichroism (CD) arises from differential absorption of right-handed and left-handed circularly polarized light by chiral molecules. In nucleic acids there are three sources of chirality. First is the asymmetric sugar; this chirality causes monomeric nucleosides to exhibit CD. The second source is the helicity of the secondary structures adopted by nucleic acids. The third source of CD results from long-range tertiary ordering of DNA in some environments. CD of monomeric constituents of nucleic acids and short single-stranded fragments were described previously. The theory of CD is well-developed and complex. Nevertheless, the use of CD spectroscopy to elucidate nucleic acid secondary structure is mainly based on empirical grounds. Conventional CD spectroscopy operates within the spectral range of about 200 nm to 320 nm. For these measurements, conventional spectrometers are used. CD spectroscopy is even more sensitive and informative in the far UV region below 200 nm, but these measurements are difficult to perform and the specialized instruments required are expensive. CD spectra of nucleic acids can also be measured in the infrared region, but here the method is much less sensitive. In this chapter we will focus on CD results obtained in the 200- to 320-nm range, the range mostly used to study secondary structures of nucleic acids.
Links
ED1.1.00/02.0068, research and development projectName: CEITEC - central european institute of technology
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