CS

FSS:EGO404 Europe in Global Economy - Course Information

EGO404 Europe in Global Economy

Faculty of Social Studies
Spring 2019
Extent and Intensity
1/1. 8 credit(s). Type of Completion: zk (examination).
Teacher(s)
doc. Mgr. et Mgr. Oldřich Krpec, Ph.D. (lecturer)
Mgr. Vladan Hodulák, Ph.D. (lecturer)
Supervisor
prof. PhDr. Vít Hloušek, Ph.D.
Department of International Relations and European Studies - Faculty of Social Studies
Contact Person: Olga Cídlová, DiS.
Supplier department: Department of International Relations and European Studies - Faculty of Social Studies
Timetable
Wed 12:00–13:40 U43
Course Enrolment Limitations
The course is only offered to the students of the study fields the course is directly associated with.
Fields of study the course is directly associated with
Course objectives (in Czech)
Course description This course discusses the position and role of Europe in the international political economy from the pre-industrial era to the present era. The focus of the course is on the analysis of Europe as an actor in the international economy with regard to relevant historical, political, and social conditions and circumstances. A number of important theoretical concepts of international political economy (IPE) will be used for such analysis. The first part of the course deals with the ascendancy of Europe as an economic leader, the Europeanization of the international economy and a discussion of specific conditions for the takeoff of the West. The following part of the course consists of a discussion of the contemporary position of Europe in the world economy – in international trade and monetary issues, and the competitiveness of Europe and its position in key international organizations and regimes. The last part of the course focuses on selected issues, such as the widening of Europe (the accession and convergence of new members), the specifics and the future of the European social market model, and the potential of further European integration and its political and economic logic. At the end of the course, students should acquire a solid understanding of international economic relations and the position of the European economy in the world economy. Students should possess basic skills and competences to analyze the contemporary European economy in international political and economic relations.
Syllabus (in Czech)
  • Week 1: Europe in the International Economy 1500-1800. Readings: - Aldcroft, D.; Sutcliffe, A.: Europe in the International Economy 1500-2000. EE Publishing, 1999. Pages 16-49 (33 pp.); - Maddison, A.: The World Economy, Vol. 1 Millennial Perspective. OECD Publishing 2001. Pages 29-51 (22 pp). Week 2: Europeanization of the International Economy, the Industrial Revolution. Readings: - Aldcroft, D.; Sutcliffe, A.: Europe in the International Economy 1500-2000. EE Publishing, 1999. Pages 50-101 (51 pp.); - Maddison, A.: The World Economy, Vol. 1 Millennial Perspective. OECD Publishing 2001. Pages 51-124 (73 pp). Week 3: The Inter-War Period. Readings: - Aldcroft, D.; Sutcliffe, A.: Europe in the International Economy 1500-2000. EE Publishing, 1999. Pages 129-176 (47 pp.); - Maddison, A.: The World Economy, Vol. 1 Millennial Perspective. OECD Publishing 2001. Pages 125-169 (44 pp). Week 4: The European Economy: Reconstruction and the Golden Age. Readings: - Eichengreen, B. The European Economy since 1945. Princeton. 2007. Pages 52-85 (23 p.); - Eichengreen, B. The European Economy since 1945. Princeton. 2007. Pages 86-130, 198-225 (27 p.). Week 5: Structural Problems and Adjustment. Readings: - Eichengreen, B. The European Economy since 1945. Princeton. 2007. Pages 225-251 (26 pp.). Week 6: Europe and Economic Integration. Readings: - Eichengreen, B. The European Economy since 1945. Princeton. 2007. Pages 163-197, 335-378 (77 pp.); - El-Agraa, A.: The European Union – Economics and Politics. Cambridge. 2011. Pages 83-101, 102-114, 126-146 (40 pp.). Week 7: Europe in International Trade, Trade Statistics. Readings: - El-Agraa, A.: The European Union – Economics and Politics. Cambridge. 2011. Pages 383-400, 401-422 (38 pp.). Week 8: The European Economy and the Competiveness Issue. Readings: - El-Agraa, A.: The European Union – Economics and Politics. Cambridge. 2011. Pages 214-228 (14 pp.). Week 9: Political Economy of European monetary integration. Readings: - El-Agraa, A.: The European Union – Economics and Politics. Cambridge. 2011. Pages 147-162, 163-181 (33 pp.). Week 10: The EU in the International Monetary and Financial Regime Readings: - Cohen, B.: “Dollar Dominance, Euro Aspirations: Recipe for Discord?” Journal of Common Market Studies. Vol. 47, no. 4, 2009. Pages 741-766 (26 pp.). - Pisani-Ferry, J.; Sapir, A.; Wolff, B.: “The Messy Rebuilding of Europe.” Bruegel Policy Brief 2012/1, pp 1-8 (34 pp.). Week 11: Convergence of Central Europe in the EU – a Case Study. Week 12: Review and Discussion.
Literature
    required literature
  • The European Union : economics and policies. Edited by A. M. El-Agraa. 9th ed. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2011. xxvii, 489. ISBN 9781107400115. info
  • MADDISON, Angus. Contours of the world economy, 1-2030 AD : essays in macro-economic history. 1st ed. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. xii, 418. ISBN 9780199227211. info
  • EICHENGREEN, Barry J. The European economy since 1945 : coordinated capitalism and beyond. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2007. xx, 495. ISBN 9780691138480. info
  • Europe in the international economy 1500 to 2000. Edited by Derek H. Aldcroft - Anthony Sutcliffe. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 1999. xi, 289 s. ISBN 1-84376-332-X. info
Teaching methods
Form of teaching and students’ assignments 1. Students are encouraged to actively participate in the lectures by posing questions of clarification or bringing up problems for discussion. 2. At the end of the semester, students should submit a 5-page-long final paper on a topic relevant to the course. 3. There will be a final in-class written exam, consisting of five questions based on the required readings and the discussions in class.
Assessment methods
Final Written Test and Final Paper The final written test will be composed of 5 open questions (each max. 5 points). You can obtain in sum up to 25 points for your answers. The final paper on topic relevant to the course will be awarded up to 5 points. The test will take place during the exam period (May and June). The exact dates of the exam will be listed in the Information System by the mid-April. Final Grading The final grade consists of the written exam test (up to 25 points) and assessment of final papers assessment (up to 5 points): “A” grade 28-30 points “B” grade 25-27 points “C” grade 22-24 points “D” grade 20-21 points “E” grade 18-19 points “F” grade less than 18 points
Language of instruction
English
Further Comments
The course is taught annually.
The course is also listed under the following terms Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018.
  • Enrolment Statistics (recent)
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