PSBB010 Motivation of action and inaction

Faculty of Arts
Spring 2020
Extent and Intensity
1/1/0. 3 credit(s). Type of Completion: k (colloquium).
Teacher(s)
Mgr. Tatiana Malatincová, Ph.D. (lecturer)
Guaranteed by
Mgr. Tatiana Malatincová, Ph.D.
Department of Psychology - Faculty of Arts
Contact Person: Jarmila Valchářová
Supplier department: Department of Psychology - Faculty of Arts
Timetable
Thu 12:00–13:40 B2.44
Prerequisites (in Czech)
PSBA003 General Psychology I && PSBA007 General Psychology II
Course Enrolment Limitations
The course is only offered to the students of the study fields the course is directly associated with.

The capacity limit for the course is 10 student(s).
Current registration and enrolment status: enrolled: 0/10, only registered: 0/10
fields of study / plans the course is directly associated with
Course objectives
The course deals with the issue of "inner barriers in self-fulfillment". Using knowledge from different fields of psychology, it seeks answers for the questions of why people are often unable to do what they want to, are able to, and are even obliged to do, how can self-regulation problems such as procrastination and other bad habits be tackled, and what the ingredients are for increasing adaptive functioning and achieving positive long-term change. The material covered in the lesson can directly serve for addressing problems common for the lives of most people including students themselves, but also their potential future clients.
The main goals of the course are:
1. To enhance students' understanding of why well-developed and researched theories are indispensable tools for addressing common problems encountered by professional psychologists;
2. To provide an overview of important current theories of motivation and regulation of human action that are used for describing the mechanisms of goal-directed behaviour and self-regulation problems;
3. To promote students' skills of critical discussion and asking well-chosen purposive questions;
4. To demonstrate how specific theories of motivation and self-regulation can be applied in searching for solutions to self-regulation problems.
Learning outcomes
After completing the course students will show knowledge of a wide variety of key modern theories of motivation and self-regulation, including corresponding research, mutual interconnectedness, and the way in which the theories can be integrated to help psychologists tackle the complex issue of self-regulation problems such as procrastination or unhealthy lifestyles. Students will also be able to use the theories in analysing their own and other people's actual self-regulation problems and derive potential strategies for intervention and improvement. An important skill to be developed through this course is the skill of using theory and corresponding research findings as tools for addressing various problems psychologists encounter in their professional practice.
Syllabus
  • 1. Basic concepts of motivation and self-regulation psychology. Classic theories of motivation - the hydraulic model the field theory. Motivation as a function of expectancy, value and psychological distance.
  • 2. Why are some behaviours harder than others? Automatic vs. controlled processes. Habits, principles of conditioning, and automated behaviour. Dimensions of impulsivity.
  • 3. How to overcome habits and impulses? Emotion regulation and the ego depletion theory.
  • 4. How behaviour is triggered based on cognitive (goal) representations? Cognitive components of self-regulation: executive functions and standards (representations of desirable states). Tolman and TOTE - the basic cybernetic model of behaviour regulation.
  • 5. Why is it so hard to launch behaviour based purely on mental representations? Goal priming. The problem of conflict and construal level. Equifinality and multifinality.
  • 6. Why are plans so important for self-regulation? The Rubicon Model; mindsets; implementation intentions.
  • 7. What role does affect play in self-regulated behaviour? What is the "self"? The two-step cybernetic model of self-regulation. Intuitive vs. controlled regulation of behaviour by self and affect regulation - PSI theory and action/state orientations.
  • 8. Why is integrated self crucial for effective long-term self-regulation? Self-Determination Theory - basic psychological needs; autonomy vs. controlled orientation; types of motivation based on the level of self-determination.
  • 9. How is self-regulation influenced by self-beliefs? Self-efficacy, learned helplessness and pesimism; growth vs. fixed mindset; the role of self-esteem and self-protective mechanisms.
  • 10. Why, when and how to focus on growth and learning? Achievement motivation; evaluation criteria; success vs. failure; mastery vs. performance goals. Promotion vs. prevention focus.
Literature
  • Reeve, J. (2009). UNDERSTANDING MOTIVATION AND EMOTION (5th ed.). Wiley.
  • Heckhausen, J., & Heckhausen, H. (eds.) (2008). MOTIVATION AND ACTION. Springer-Verlag.
  • Ryan, R. M. (ed.) (2012). OXFORD HANDBOOK OF HUMAN MOTIVATION. Oxford University Press.
  • Weiner, B. (1992). HUMAN MOTIVATION: METAPHORS, THEORIES, AND RESEARCH. Sage.
  • Elliot, A. J., Dweck, C. S., & Yeager, D. S. (Eds.) (2017). HANDBOOK OF COMPETENCE AND MOTIVATION: THEORY AND APPLICATION (2nd ed.). Guilford Press.
  • Elliot, A. J., & Dweck, C. S. (Eds.) (2005). HANDBOOK OF COMPETENCE AND MOTIVATION. Guilford Press.
  • Vohs, K. D., & Baumeister, R. F. (eds.) (2016). HANDBOOK OF SELF-REGULATION: RESEARCH, THEORY, AND APPLICATIONS (3rd ed.). Guilford Press.
  • Vohs, K. D., & Baumeister, R. F. (eds.) (2011). HANDBOOK OF SELF-REGULATION: RESEARCH, THEORY, AND APPLICATIONS (2nd ed.). Guilford Press.
  • Moskowitz, G. B., & Grant, H. (2009). THE PSYCHOLOGY OF GOALS. Guilford Press.
  • Gross, J. J. (ed.) (2007). HANDBOOK OF EMOTION REGULATION. Guilford Press.
  • Hoyle, R. H. (ed.) (2010). HANDBOOK OF PERSONALITY AND SELF-REGULATION. Wiley-Backwell.
  • Ryan, R. M. & Deci, E. L. (eds.) (2017). SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY: BASIC PSYCHOLOGICAL NEEDS IN MOTIVATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND WELLNESS. The Guilford Press.
  • Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (eds.) (2002). HANDBOOK OF SELF-DETERMINATION RESEARCH. The University of Rochester Press.
  • Sansone, C., & Harackiewicz, J. M. (2000). INTRINSIC AND EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION: THE SEARCH FOR OPTIMAL MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE. Academic Press.
  • Kahneman, D. (2010). THINKING, FAST AND SLOW. Penguin Books.
Teaching methods
Lectures and classroom discussion. A moodle course will be opened in the ELF.
Assessment methods
Students are expected to complete weekly assignments in the form of short reflections on particular topics which will be discussed in the lessons. It is also required that they obtain a certain number of points in the Mastery Enhancement Feedback quizzes available in the ELF. The course is concluded by a discussion focused on real-life application and students' own motivational and self-regulatory profiles based on the theory covered by the course. A submission of a written (free-style) summary is required for participation in the final discussion. Standard attendance requirements apply (max. 20% absences if unexcused, otherwise all absences must be excused).
Language of instruction
Czech
Further comments (probably available only in Czech)
Study Materials
The course is taught annually.

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