FICSÓR, Márk and Zoltán Szabolcs CSABAI. Longitudinal zonation of larval Hydropsyche (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae): abiotic environmental factors and biotic interactions behind the downstream sequence of Central European species. Hydrobiologia. Dordrecht: Springer, 2021, vol. 848, No 15, p. 3371-3388. ISSN 0018-8158. doi:10.1007/s10750-021-04602-0.
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Basic information
Original name Longitudinal zonation of larval Hydropsyche (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae): abiotic environmental factors and biotic interactions behind the downstream sequence of Central European species
Authors FICSÓR, Márk (guarantor) and Zoltán Szabolcs CSABAI (348 Hungary, belonging to the institution).
Edition Hydrobiologia, Dordrecht, Springer, 2021, 0018-8158.
Other information
Original language English
Type of outcome Article in a journal
Field of Study 10617 Marine biology, freshwater biology, limnology
Country of publisher Netherlands
Confidentiality degree is not subject to a state or trade secret
WWW URL
Impact factor Impact factor: 2.822
RIV identification code RIV/00216224:14310/21:00123330
Organization unit Faculty of Science
Doi http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10750-021-04602-0
UT WoS 000650076600001
Keywords in English Hydropsychidae; Longitudinal distribution; Abiotic factors; Biotic interactions
Tags rivok
Tags International impact, Reviewed
Changed by Changed by: Mgr. Marie Šípková, DiS., učo 437722. Changed: 13/1/2022 12:52.
Abstract
The aim of this review is to summarize the literature knowledge about how abiotic environmental factors and biotic interactions affect the sequentially overlapping longitudinal distribution of Central European species of the net-spinning freshwater caddisfly larvae of the genus Hydropsyche (Trichoptera: Hydropsychidae). In this relation, several physical and chemical parameters of water are discussed, as well as different species-specific traits, behavioural aspects and the interaction of coexisting species. Longitudinal gradients of river networks, especially annual temperature range, flow velocity and the particle size of suspended food material play a crucial role in forming the downstream succession of characteristic species, while increased levels of organic pollution, nutrients, salinity and heavy metals facilitates the presence of more tolerant ones. Several species-specific traits, such as respiration range, net-building frequency, head capsule size or optimal net-building velocity correlate with the position of a given species in the sequence. Coexistence of species with similar ecological demands in the overlapping zones of distribution is facilitated by differences in feeding and net-building habits, microhabitat preferences and staggering life cycles, but complicated at the same time by means of inter- and intraspecific territorial behaviour, such as fighting for the ownership of larval retreats or the practice of stridulation.
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