KAYLOR, Michael Matthew. "Because Beneath the Lake a Treasure Sank": Dolben as Johnson's Uranian Heir. Brno Studies in English 32. Brno: Masarykova univerzita v Brně, 2008, vol. 2006, No 32, p. 129-142. ISSN 1211-1791.
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Basic information
Original name "Because Beneath the Lake a Treasure Sank": Dolben as Johnson's Uranian Heir
Name in Czech "Because Beneath the Lake a Treasure Sank": Dolben as Johnson's Uranian Heir
Authors KAYLOR, Michael Matthew (840 United States of America, guarantor).
Edition Brno Studies in English 32, Brno, Masarykova univerzita v Brně, 2008, 1211-1791.
Other information
Original language English
Type of outcome Article in a journal
Field of Study Literature, mass media, audio-visual activities
Country of publisher Czech Republic
Confidentiality degree is not subject to a state or trade secret
RIV identification code RIV/00216224:14210/08:00033492
Organization unit Faculty of Arts
Keywords in English Digby Dolben; William Johnson; William Johnson Cory; Uranian poetry; Uranians; Victorian poetry; pederasty
Tags Digby Dolben, pederasty, Uranian poetry, Uranians, Victorian poetry, William Johnson, William Johnson Cory
Tags International impact, Reviewed
Changed by Changed by: doc. Michael Matthew Kaylor, PhD., učo 132640. Changed: 14/4/2010 17:32.
Abstract
This article considers the influence of William Johnson (later Cory) on his former Eton pupil Digby Mackworth Dolben, as well as the ways that Dolben's poem "A Vocation" responds to Johnson's poem "An Invocation." The result is a close reading that displays the intertextual strategies, mostly Classical in their allusiveness, employed by Uranian writers to disclose their desires to their congenial coterie as well as to render those desires opaque to general readers.
Abstract (in Czech)
This article considers the influence of William Johnson (later Cory) on his former Eton pupil Digby Mackworth Dolben, as well as the ways that Dolben's poem "A Vocation" responds to Johnson's poem "An Invocation." The result is a close reading that displays the intertextual strategies, mostly Classical in their allusiveness, employed by Uranian writers to disclose their desires to their congenial coterie as well as to render those desires opaque to general readers.
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