MVZb2006 Defusing the "Powder Keg": Dissolution of Yugoslavia and International Intervention

Fakulta sociálních studií
jaro 2020
Rozsah
1/1/0. 5 kr. Ukončení: zk.
Vyučující
Bc. Mgr. Vladimir Dordevic, Ph.D. (přednášející)
Garance
PhDr. Petr Suchý, Ph.D.
Katedra mezinárodních vztahů a evropských studií - Fakulta sociálních studií
Kontaktní osoba: Olga Cídlová, DiS.
Dodavatelské pracoviště: Katedra mezinárodních vztahů a evropských studií - Fakulta sociálních studií
Rozvrh
Po 18:00–19:40 P22
Předpoklady
! MVZ206 Dissolution of Yugoslavia && ! NOW ( MVZ206 Dissolution of Yugoslavia )
This course is intended to provide comprehensive information on dissolution of the joint Yugoslav state and the international intervention that followed. In that respect, the course is to instruct students into: 1- Historical legacy of the Yugoslav state, its features, and functioning; 2- Factors, domestic and international equally, that contributed to the dissolution of the said state; 3- International intervention from 1991 to the Kosovo conflict of 1999, and its main characteristics; 4- Political, economic, social realities, perspectives and trends in all Yugoslav successor states from 1989 to present times, and lastly 5- International perspective in terms of the Euro-Atlantic integration of the said states.
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Předmět si smí zapsat nejvýše 40 stud.
Momentální stav registrace a zápisu: zapsáno: 32/40, pouze zareg.: 0/40
Mateřské obory/plány
předmět má 42 mateřských oborů, zobrazit
Cíle předmětu
Students attending the course will gain knowledge in historical development of the joint Yugoslav state, its main features, as well as major obstacles and issues in its functioning. Students will also be instructed in factors, domestic and international equally, that contributed to the dissolution of Yugoslavia and sparked the consequent wars of succession. Furthermore, the course is designed to provide comprehensive information and assessment of the international intervention, but also focuses on changes that occurred after the intervention was concluded. In that respect, domestic politics of all Yugoslav successor states will be examined as they developed from the dissolution of the joint state to present times. Last but not least, international perspective of the Euro-Atlantic integration process will also be analyzed to present a more exact picture of the ex-Yugoslav space over the period of more than two decades.
Výstupy z učení
Students attending the course will gain knowledge in historical development of the joint Yugoslav state, its main features, as well as major obstacles and issues in its functioning. Students will also be instructed in factors, domestic and international equally, that contributed to the dissolution of Yugoslavia and sparked the consequent wars of succession.
Osnova
  • Program: 1- Introduction (general info on the course) 2- Yugoslavia as History I: Yugoslavism as an Idea/ First Yugoslavia (1918-1941) Required readings: - Djokić, Dejan and Ker-Lindsay, James (ed.) (2011). New Perspectives on Yugoslavia: Key Issues and Controversies. Oxon: Routledge Chapters 1, 3, and 4, pp. 10-26, and 46-81. Optional readings: - Djokić, Dejan (ed.) (2003). Yugoslavism: Histories of a Failed Idea, 1918-1992. London: C. Hurst and Co. Publishers *Introduction, pp. 11-27; Part I, pp. 136-157. 3- Yugoslavia as History II: Yugoslav Communism/ Socialist Yugoslavia from 1945 to 1980 Required readings: - Benson, Leslie (2004). Yugoslavia: A Concise History. Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan *Chapters 6 and 7, pp. 94-132. 4- Yugoslav Crisis I: Political Disintegration of the 1980s Required readings: - Benson, Leslie (2004). Yugoslavia: A Concise History. Hampshire and New York: Palgrave Macmillan *Chapter 8, pp. 132-155. 5- Yugoslav Crisis II: Economic and Social Downfall of the 1980s/ Assessing Different Approaches to Yugoslav Collapse Required readings: - Jović, Dejan (2009). Yugoslavia: A State that Withered Away. West Lafayette: Purdue University Press *Chapters 1 and 4, pp. 13-33 and 141-171. 6- International Intervention I (1991 --- mid-1992): The End of the Cold War and of Yugoslavia/ Diplomatic Initiative of the EC/ Carrington-Cutileiro Plan Required readings: - Gow, James (1997). Triumph of Lack of Will: International Diplomacy and the Yugoslav War. London: C. Hurst and Co. Publishers *Chapters 2, 3 and 4, pp. 20-99. Optional readings: - Weller, Marc (1992). “International Response to the Dissolution of Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia,” The American Journal of International Law, Vol. 86, No. 3, pp. 569-607. - Simms, Brendan (2001). Unfinest Hour: Britain and the Destruction of Bosnia. London: Penguin Books *Chapter 2, pp. 49-90. *- Most comprehensive account of military campaigns in the Yugoslav wars is given in: CIA (2002). Balkan Battlegrounds: A Military History of the Yugoslav Conflict, 1990-1995. Washington, D.C.: Central Intelligence Agency, Office for Russian and European Analysis 7- International Intervention II (mid-1992 --- mid-1993): US Policy from Bush to Clinton/ London Peace Conference/ ‘Safe Areas’ and Death of Vance-Owen Plan Required readings: - Gow, James (1997). Triumph of Lack of Will: International Diplomacy and the Yugoslav War. London: C. Hurst and Co. Publishers *Chapters 8 and 9, pp. 208-253. Optional readings: - Simms, Brendan (2001). Unfinest Hour: Britain and the Destruction of Bosnia. London: Penguin Books *Chapter 4, pp. 135-173. 8- International Intervention III (mid-1993 --- 1995): American ‘U-Turn’/ Contact Group Plan/ The Dayton Peace Agreement Required readings: - Gow, James (1997). Triumph of Lack of Will: International Diplomacy and the Yugoslav War. London: C. Hurst and Co. Publishers *Chapters 9 and 10, pp. 253-298. Optional readings: - Holbrooke, Richard (1998). To End a War. New York: Random House *Book III: Dayton, pp. 231-315. 9- International Intervention IV: Assessments/ Role of the International Community revisited Required readings: - Gow, James (1997). Triumph of Lack of Will: International Diplomacy and the Yugoslav War. London: C. Hurst and Co. Publishers *Chapter 11, pp. 315-331. Optional readings: -Ullman, Richard, H. (ed.) (1996). The World and Yugoslavia’s Wars. New York: Council on Foreign Relations *Chapters 5 and 6, pp. 122- 182. - Magas, Branka and Zanic, Ivo (ed.) (2001). The War in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1991-1995. London: Frank Cass Publishers *Chapters 10 and 11, pp. 271-305. - Simms, Brendan (2001). Unfinest Hour: Britain and the Destruction of Bosnia. London: Penguin Books *Chapter 8, pp. 314-351. 10- The ‘Final’ Yugoslav issue: Kosovo between Serbs and Albanians/ Operation ‘Allied Force’/ Evolution of International Thinking on Kosovo Required readings: - Mertus, Julie, A. (2009). “Operation Allied Force: Handmaiden of Independent Kosovo,” International Affairs 85 (3), pp. 461-476. - Hehir, Aidan (ed.) (2010). Kosovo, Intervention and Statebuilding: The International Community and the Transition to Independence. Oxon: Routledge *Chapter 10, pp. 185-197. Optional readings: - Judah, Tim (2000). Kosovo: War and Revenge. New Haven and London: Yale University Press *Chapters 1 and 2, pp. 1-61. 11- Yugoslav Successor States I: Slovenia/ Croatia/ FRY (Serbia-Montenegro) Required readings: - Ramet, Sabrina, P. (ed.) (2010). Central and Southeast European Politics since 1989. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press *Chapters 11-13, pp. 235-311. 12- Yugoslav Successor States II: BiH/ Macedonia/ Kosova Required readings: - Ramet, Sabrina, P. (ed.) (2010). Central and Southeast European Politics since 1989. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press *Chapters 13- 16, pp. 311-377. 13- International Perspective: Prospects of the Euro-Atlantic Integrations/ Regional Overview/ *Course wrap-up (conclusions and final remarks) Required readings: - Aybet, Gülnur, Moore, Rebecca, R. and Freedman, Lawrence (2010). NATO in Search of a Vision. Washington, D.C.: Georgetown University Press *Chapter 8, pp. 175-201. - Mylonas, Harris (2012). “The Future of Euro-Atlantic Integration in the Western Balkans,” PONARS Eurasia Policy Memo No. 208, The George Washington University Elliott School of International Affairs, pp. 1-5. - Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe- United States Helsinki Commission Hearing: “The Western Balkans and the 2012 NATO Summit,” Testimony by Ivan Vejvoda, pp. 1-13. Optional readings: - Belloni, Roberto (2009). “European Integration and the Western Balkans: Lessons, Prospects and Obstacles,” Journal of Balkan and Near Eastern Studies 11 (3), pp. 313-331.
Literatura
    povinná literatura
  • Materials as given in the syllabus and provided in the IS
Výukové metody
Course Requirements: 1) Students are expected to attend lectures and only those who have attended 60% of lectures (7 lectures) will be allowed to sit the Final exam. On the other hand, students are invited to contribute actively in discussions if they wish to do so. Active participation is recommended and thus not obligatory! Those actively contributing by asking questions, discussing issues at hand, and participating in group work (depending on a topic) will be granted additional points at the end of the course and will have a chance of achieving a better grade. 2) Students are expected to read all Required readings and it will be assumed that students have read them (42 pages per week). Optional readings are not compulsory (and also not added to certain seminars) for successful completion of the course, but are listed as important sources of additional information on topics at hand, thus those students interested in further explorations of respective topics may consult these readings. The first seminar has no readings assigned. 3) Students are required to write 6 short position papers (cca. 3600-4200 characters, i.e. 2-2.5 pages) for seminars of their choice. Position papers should include a Summary of main points of required readings, a Critique of these readings and Questions for discussion. Thus, position papers must have three clearly identified sections: 1. Summary, 2. Critique and 3. Questions. Position papers that do not meet this requirement will be rejected and no points will be awarded. It shall be noted that the second section, the one of Critique, is deemed the most important because it reflects one’s personal stance on issue(s) at hand, thus this section needs to be the longest one in a position paper (i.e. not less than one page and not more than page and a half long). Position papers should be inserted into a proper Folder in “Student Papers” (according to the seminar dates) in IS (Information System) not later than 30 hours (Tuesday at 8 a.m.) before designated lecture. Uploading papers into IS later than required will result in 3 points being deducted thus maximum points reached on that particular paper would be 7. 4) Final in-class exam is to be passed by students at the end of the course.
Metody hodnocení
Grading: The final grade will be calculated as a composite evaluation of two parts: 1) 6 position papers>> each max. 10 points, i.e. 6 x 10 points= total 60 points; 2) Final exam>> 2 questions x max. 7 points (2 x 7) + 2 questions x max. 5 points (2 x 5) + 1 question x max. 1 point (1 x 1) = 14+10+1= total 25 points. Maximum: 85 points. Pass: 55 points (65 %). **Points for activity during lectures (discussions) will be awarded at the end of the course only to the active students. Students active on or more than 70% of discussions= 12 points; those active on 30% - 70% of discussions= 6 points; those active on less than 30% of discussions= 0 points. *Grades: A> 80 – 85 points B> 74 – 79 points C> 68 – 73 points D> 62 – 67 points E> 55 – 61 points F> less than 55 points Workload: •6 position papers •Readings (42 pages per week) and lectures (discussions) •Final exam
Vyučovací jazyk
Angličtina
Informace učitele
https://is.muni.cz/auth/person/268162?lang=en
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