MVZn5078 Human Rights in Post-Conflict Societies

Fakulta sociálních studií
podzim 2020
Rozsah
1/1/0. 5 kr. Ukončení: zk.
Vyučující
Bc. Mgr. Vladimir Dordevic, Ph.D. (přednášející)
Garance
doc. PhDr. Zdeněk Kříž, Ph.D.
Katedra mezinárodních vztahů a evropských studií - Fakulta sociálních studií
Kontaktní osoba: Olga Cídlová, DiS.
Dodavatelské pracoviště: Katedra mezinárodních vztahů a evropských studií - Fakulta sociálních studií
Předpoklady
! MVZ478 Human Rights in Post-Conflict && ! NOW ( MVZ478 Human Rights in Post-Conflict )
This course is intended to provide students with comprehensive information concerning post- conflict transformation in respect to human rights (HRs) by discussing cases of the Western Balkans (former Yugoslavia), Haiti, East Timor, Rwanda, and finally Sri Lanka. The course is to provide students with introduction into basic tenets of HRs in both theory and history, thus allowing for the aforementioned cases to be properly examined in regards to HRs abuses, international community’s (non)intervention and its influence, as well as more contemporary post-conflict developments in terms of current HRs conditions. Considering the fact that these cases represent post-conflict areas differing in degrees of success of post-conflict transformation, with three of them also having experienced some form of international intervention in the past, it would be interesting to examine them and compare differences and similarities in this particular regard. To sum up, the course shall provide insight into: 1- Basic tenets of HRs, with introduction into procedures and devices for promoting and protecting HRs; contemporary international and domestic 2- Major HRs abuses that took place during the conflicts examined; 3- Issues tied to the impact of the international community through international (non)intervention and its relation to HRs, particularly regarding roles of national governments, international organizations, and (international) NGOs in this process; and 4- Post-conflict transformation and transition, whereby dealing with the past, reconciliation efforts, truth initiatives, achieving justice in the societies in question, and finally current state of HRs loom large.
Omezení zápisu do předmětu
Předmět je určen pouze studentům mateřských oborů.

Předmět si smí zapsat nejvýše 35 stud.
Momentální stav registrace a zápisu: zapsáno: 0/35, pouze zareg.: 13/35
Mateřské obory/plány
Cíle předmětu
Students attending the course will gain knowledge in HRs in post-conflict societies undergoing overall societal transformation. In that respect, they will be instructed into (1) basic tenets of HRs in theory and history, with information on contemporary international and domestic mechanisms and devices for promoting and protecting HRs, (2) major HRs abuses that characterized the conflicts examined, (3) the impact of the international (non)intervention in respect to HRs, with roles of national governments, international organizations, and (international) NGOs also examined, (4) and finally post-conflict transition, with topics such as dealing with the past, reconciliation and truth initiatives, justice, and current state of HRs being addressed. Hence, the course has been designed not only to allow students to gain basic insight into theory and history of HRs (theoretical framework), but also to provide information on problems related to HRs abuses during and after the conflicts, the international (non)intervention issues, as well as post-conflict transition seen through prism of HRs (practical approach, case-study framework).
Výstupy z učení
Students attending the course will gain knowledge in HRs in post-conflict societies undergoing overall societal transformation.
Osnova
  • Program: 1- Introduction (general info on the course) 2- Human Rights in Theory I Required readings: Donnelly, Jack. 2013. Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, pp. 7-40. 3- Human Rights in Theory II Required readings: Donnelly, Jack. 2013. Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, pp. 40-71. 4- Human Rights in History Required readings: Donnelly, Jack. 2013. Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, pp. 75-93. 5- Human Rights in Contemporary Practice I Required readings: Benedek, Wolfgang (ed.). 2012. Understanding Human Rights. Graz: European Training and Research Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (ETC), pp. 41-59. O’Neill, William G. and Lyth, Annette. “The International Human Rights System,” In *UN system chart 6- Human Rights in Contemporary Practice II Required readings: Human Rights Standards: Learning from Experience, International Council on Human Rights Policy, 2006, pp. 7-53. Seybolt, Taylor B. 2008. Humanitarian Military Intervention: The Conditions for Success and Failure. Stockholm: SIPRI and Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 7-45. *UN system chart 7- Human Rights in Post-Conflict Societies I: The Western Balkans Required readings: Final periodic report on the situation of human rights in the territory of the former Yugoslavia submitted by Mr. Tadeusz Mazowiecki, UN Economic and Social Council, 1995, pp. 1-20. Magaš, Branka and Žaniċ, Ivo (ed.) (2001). The War in Bosnia and Herzegovina, 1991-1995. London: Frank Cass Publishers, Chapters 10 and 11, pp. 271-305. Kostovičova, Denisa. Civil society and reconciliation in the Western Balkans: great expectations? In: Prifti, Eviola, (ed.) 2013. The European future of the Western Balkans- Thessaloniki@10. Paris: EU Institute for Security Studies, pp. 101-109. Balkans: Protecting Rights Key for EU Progress, Human Rights Watch, pp. 1-2. Background info: BBC documentary ‘The Death of Yugoslavia’ is available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_PzsfXbyAw&list=PLqD5Su3ZJjjbCsgVCE90msl9d4 nHdV4Pu (Please follow all six links for the complete documentary!) Skåre, Siri, Burkey, Ingvild and Mørk, Hege (eds.) 2008. Introduction for Human Rights Field Officers. Oslo: Norwegian Centre for Human Rights, pp. 1- 30. 8- Human Rights in Post-Conflict Societies II: Haiti Required readings: Terror Prevails in Haiti: Human Rights Violations and Failed Diplomacy, Human Rights Watch, 1994, pp. 38-50. James, Erica Caple. “Ruptures, rights, and repair: The political economy of trauma in Haiti,” Social Science & Medicine 70, 2010, pp. 106–113. “The long history of troubled ties between Haiti and the US,” BBC News, 2010, pp. 1-3. World Report 2017: Haiti, Human Rights Watch, pp. 1-5. Report of the Secretary-General on the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, UN Security Council, 2016, pp. 1-11. Background info: Journeyman Pictures’ documentary “Inside a Failed State- Haiti” is available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vv7oc99y2Ro 9- Human Rights in Post-Conflict Societies III: East Timor Required readings: Cotton, James. “Against the Grain: The East Timor Intervention.” Survival, Vol. 43, No. 1, Spring 2001, pp. 127–142. Järvinen, Taina. “Human Rights and Post-Conflict Transitional Justice in East Timor.” UPI (The Finnish Institute of International Affairs (FIIA)) Working Paper 47, 2004, pp. 23-33 and 72-75. Seybolt, Taylor B. 2008. Humanitarian Military Intervention: The Conditions for Success and Failure. Stockholm: SIPRI and Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 86-93. “Fifteen years of freedom for Timor-Leste,” Asia Times, 2017, pp. 1-12. Background info: Journeyman Pictures’ documentary “The Bloody Price of East Timor's Independence” is available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AvtB2OYW5WY 10- Human Rights in Post-Conflict Societies IV: Rwanda Required readings: Buckley-Zistel, Susanne. “Ethnographic research after violent conflicts: personal reflections on dilemmas and challenges,” Journal of Peace Conflict & Development 10, 2007, pp. 3-9. Buckley-Zistel, Susanne. “The Gacaca Tribunals in Rwanda: Community Justice?”, Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung (HSFK), 2007, pp. 1-4. Zraly M., and Nyirazinyoye L. “Don’t Let the Suffering Make You Fade Away: An Ethnographic Study of Resilience among Survivors of Genocide-Rape in Southern Rwanda,” Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 70, Issue 10, 2010, pp. 1656-1664. Fred Aja Agwu. “The Challenge of Humanitarian Intervention Since Rwanda,” Council of Councils (CFR) Global Memo, 2014, pp. 1-4. World Report 2017: Rwanda, Human Rights Watch, pp. 1-6. Background info: PBS documentary ‘Ghosts of Rwanda’ is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ze14hD2k_T0 11- Human Rights in Post-Conflict Societies V: Sri Lanka Required readings: available at: War Crimes in Sri Lanka, International Crisis Group Report No. 191, 2010, pp. 4-35. Walton, Oliver. “Timing and Sequencing of Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Peacebuilding in Sri Lanka.” Centre for Research on Peace and Development (CRPD) Working Paper 44, 2015, pp. 2-21. World Report 2017: Sri Lanka, Human Rights Watch, pp. 1-6. Background info: Channel 4 documentary ‘Sri Lanka’s Killing Fields’ is available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rz_eCLcp1Mc 12- Course wrap-up: Concluding remarks (1/2) and Final exam (2/2)
Literatura
  • Donnelly, Jack. 2013. Universal Human Rights in Theory and Practice. Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  • Seybolt, Taylor B. 2008. Humanitarian Military Intervention: The Conditions for Success and Failure. Stockholm: SIPRI and Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Výukové metody
Students are expected to attend lectures and only those who have attended 60% of lectures (7 lectures) will be allowed to sit the Final exam. On the other hand, students are invited to contribute actively in discussions if they wish to do so. Active participation is recommended but not obligatory! Those actively contributing by asking questions, discussing issues at hand, and participating in group work (depending on a topic) will be granted additional points at the end of the course and will have a chance of achieving better grades. Class activity is highly recommended, especially if one is to achieve grade higher than ‘B.’ 2) Students are expected to read all Required readings and it will be assumed that students have read them (41 pages per week). Background information is listed as additional source of information on topics at hand, thus students are advised to address this info in order to get a more complete understanding of the issues discussed in the course, especially in cases when students do not possess necessary knowledge in this regard. The first and the last seminars have no assigned readings. 3) Students are required to write 5 short position papers (3600-4200 characters, i.e. 2- 2.5 pages) for seminars of their choice. Position papers should include a Summary of main points of required readings, a Critique of these readings and Questions for discussion. Thus, position papers must have three clearly identified sections: 1. Summary, 2. Critique and 3. Questions. Position papers that do not meet this requirement will be rejected and no points will be awarded. It shall be noted that the second section, the one of Critique, is deemed the most important because it reflects one’s personal stance on issue(s) at hand, thus this section needs to be the longest one in a position paper (i.e. not less than one page and not more than page and a half long). Position papers should be inserted into a proper Folder in “Student Papers” (according to the seminar dates) in IS (Information System) not later than 30 hours (Sunday at 14h) before designated lecture. Uploading papers into the IS later than required will result in papers being rejected regardless of reasons stated by students. In addition, all students must have at least 3 position papers in the IS by 6 November 2017 and those who do not fulfill this requirement shall be immediately penalized by failing the course. Last of all, uploading more than one position paper per week, or sending position papers via mail to the lecturer, is not allowed under any given circumstances. 4) Final in-class exam is to be taken by all students at the end of the course, and, if one chooses not to take the exam, he/she shall fail the course regardless of the number of points achieved with position papers written or by having participated in the class activities.
Metody hodnocení
Grading: The final grade will be calculated as a composite evaluation of two parts: 1) 5 position papers>> each max. 10 points, i.e. 5 x 10 points= total 50 points; 2) Final exam>> 2 questions x max. 7 points (2 x 7) + 2 questions x max. 5 points (2 x 5) + 1 question x max. 1 point (1 x 1) = 14 + 10 + 1 = total 25 points. Maximum: 85 points. Pass: 55 points (65%) **Points for activity during lectures (discussions) are awarded at the end of the course only to active students. Students active on or more than 70% of discussions= 10 points, those active on 50% - 70% of discussions= 5 points, those active on 30% - 50% of discussions= 3 points, and those active on less than 20% of discussions= 0 points. *Grades: A> 80 – 85 points B> 73 – 79 points C> 66 – 72 points D> 61 – 65 points E> 55 – 60 points F> 54 points and less Workload: -5 position papers -Readings (41 pages per week) and discussions -Final exam
Vyučovací jazyk
Angličtina
Informace učitele
https://is.muni.cz/auth/person/268162
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