AJ44001 Introduction to Literary Studies

Faculty of Arts
Spring 2009
Extent and Intensity
0/0/0. 6 credit(s). Type of Completion: zk (examination).
Teacher(s)
doc. Mgr. Pavel Drábek, Ph.D. (lecturer)
Mgr. Martina Horáková, Ph.D. (lecturer)
doc. Michael Matthew Kaylor, PhD. (lecturer)
Mgr. et Mgr. Kateřina Prajznerová, M.A., Ph.D. (lecturer)
Guaranteed by
Jeffrey Alan Vanderziel, B.A.
Department of English and American Studies - Faculty of Arts
Contact Person: Mgr. Tomáš Kačer, Ph.D.
Timetable
Fri 10:50–12:25 G22
Course Enrolment Limitations
The course is only offered to the students of the study fields the course is directly associated with.
fields of study / plans the course is directly associated with
Course objectives
This lecture series provides an introduction to some of the core literary genres and some of the most significant approaches to the study of literature. Covering authors from a variety of English-language literatures, the lectures aim to broaden the students’ awareness of diverse ways of analyzing literary texts. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking and academic writing skills and on gaining a deeper understanding of how literature affects us and enriches our perception of the world.
Syllabus
  • AJ44001 Introduction to Literature Spring 2009 Fri 10:50-12:25, room G22 Instructors: Pavel Drábek, Martina Horáková, Michael Kaylor, Tomáš Kačer, Kateřina Prajznerová Description: This lecture series provides an introduction to some of the core literary genres and some of the most significant approaches to the study of literature. Covering authors from a variety of English-language literatures, the lectures aim to broaden the students’ awareness of diverse ways of analyzing literary texts. Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on developing critical thinking and academic writing skills and on gaining a deeper understanding of how literature affects us and enriches our perception of the world. Assessment: Students will write a final exam consisting of a comprehensive short-essay question and a critical commentary on either a piece of prose or poetry. To prepare for the exam, students are required: a) to read all the assigned readings (primary as well as secondary) b) to periodically respond to one of the questions suggested at the end of each lecture (and upload these response-papers in the “odevzdávárna” in the IS) c) to take the mock-quiz on May 15th Response-paper guidelines: Purpose: to keep up with the assigned readings, practice writing about literature, notice details, make connections, return to key passages, gradually build up a course portfolio, clearly formulate one’s own thoughts in writing. Form: one fully developed paragraph (including an opening sentence and a conclusion). Content: answer one of the three suggested questions. Style: clear argumentation, a coherent paragraph written in complete sentences, integrated citations, academic language. Some suggestions: read the question you choose to answer carefully and maintain your focus on the question; support your observations by specific references to the primary as well as the secondary readings; pay attention to the progression of your argumentation and the overall structure of the paragraph; proofread the assignment before uploading it into the IS. Outline: Unit 1 / February 20: Introduction to the course and class policies Lecture (Kateřina Prajznerová): “Prose: The Essay” Readings: Barbara Kingsolver, Small Wonder Philip Gerard, “What Is Creative Nonfiction Anyhow?” (pages 1-12) Phillip Lopate, “Introduction” from The Art of the Personal Essay (pages xxiii-xlv) Thomas J. Lyon, “A Taxonomy of Nature Writing” Week 2 / March 13: Lecture (Martina Horáková): “Prose: The Novel” Readings: Kate Grenville, The Secret River Roslyn Haynes, “Introduction” from Seeking the Centre: The Australian Desert in Literature, Art and Film Richard White, “Inventing Australia” Week 3 / April 3: Lecture (Pavel Drábek/ Tomáš Kačer): “Drama” Readings: William Shakespeare, Hamlet Maynard Mack, “The World of Hamlet” Ronald Hayman, How to Read a Play Aristotle, Poetics Week 4 / April 17: Lecture (Michael Kaylor): “Poetry” Readings: Gerard Manley Hopkins, “The Windhover” John Pick, ed., The Windhover (from The Merrill Literary Casebook Series) Week 5 / May 15: Semester review and mock-quiz
Literature
  • Hayman, Ronald, How to Read a Play
  • Kingsolver, Barbara, Small Wonder
  • Hopkins, Gerard Manley, The Windhover
  • Lopate, Phillip, Introduction
  • White, Richard, Inventing Australia
  • Gerard, Philip, What Is Creative Nonfiction Anyhow
  • Aristotle, Poetics
  • Lyon, Thomas J., A Taxonomy of Nature Writing
  • Haynes, Roslyn, Introduction
  • Grenville, Kate, The Secret River
  • Pick, John, ed., The Windhover
  • Mack, Maynard, The World of Hamlet
Assessment methods
Assessment: Students will write a final exam consisting of a comprehensive short-essay question and a critical commentary on either a piece of prose or poetry. To prepare for the exam, students are required: a) to read all the assigned readings (primary as well as secondary) b) to periodically respond to one of the questions suggested at the end of each lecture (and upload these response-papers in the “odevzdávárna” in the IS) c) to take the mock-quiz on May 15th
Language of instruction
English
Further comments (probably available only in Czech)
The course is taught annually.
Information on the extent and intensity of the course: 5x2.
Teacher's information
http://www.phil.muni.cz/elf/course/category.php?id=4
The course is also listed under the following terms Spring 2005, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017, Spring 2018, Spring 2019.
  • Enrolment Statistics (Spring 2009, recent)
  • Permalink: https://is.muni.cz/course/phil/spring2009/AJ44001